Eyes on the Street: Neighborhood Bikeways

Keep your eyes on the street for another Neighborhood Bikeway demonstration on August 19!  You may have heard these transportation corridors referred to as Bike Boulevards, Green Streets, or Neighborhood Greenways. Regardless of name, the vision for these streets is the same – “quiet”, low speed, low-stress side streets shared with motorists that feel safe for bicyclists and pedestrians and promote community within neighborhoods.

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Neighborhood Bikeways encourage active transportation through simple street features such as:

  • pavement markings called sharrows – you know, the ones with a bicycle and v-shaped stripes indicating shared space for bicycles and vehicles;
  • diverters that move orkeep traffic on nearby busier streets;
  • speed humps, the name for wide, flattened speed bumps to slow traffic;
  • and curb bump-outs  or bulbs that both shorten crossing distances for people on foot and lower traffic speed.

Neighborhood Bikeways are a key part of a community’s low stress traffic network, which is designed to encourage active transportation for people of all ages and abilities. The routes for last year’s Open Streets event on 11th Street and this summer’s event on 27th Street were selected because they are streets identified as having the potential to become future Neighborhood Bikeways. Come find out for yourself when you walk, bike, and play with us on August 19th!

Good Times

Tracy Oulman is the City’s Housing and Neighborhood Coordinator. She rides the same bike she’s had since college and still doesn’t know how to work the gears, but she always uses hand signals.
Giant Scrabble…a flying bicycle carousel…beanbag toss…relays. And some things for the kids to do, too. Open Streets is a great big good time that reminds us how important it is to have fun together.

Open Streets (4 of 19)Have you ever been in the middle of an intense conversation when something funny happens? It’s like a timeout – smiles crack, laughter spreads, the room exhales. It’s a pause that resets the tone and gives us something to share.

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Open Streets gives Corvallis a timeout to remember why we love the place we live and have a good time together. Put it on your calendar, tell your friends and family, get up early and host a breakfast before you go. Get ready for an exhale – we are about to have some fun!
Date: August 19, 2018 from 12p – 4p
Route: Cloverland Park to Harding Center
Get Involved! Open Streets takes people power! Intersection superheroes, door hanger distributors, beer garden monitors – opportunities from 1 hour to all day – tell us what you’re up for. Sign-up now and spread the word to everyone you know who might be interested. The more the merrier!

Using Our Streets

Open Streets Corvallis gives you a chance to gain confidence and have fun while family or solo bicycling on Corvallis’ emerging neighborhood bikeways. In anticipation of this year’s event on August 19 between Cloverland Park and Harding Center, we wanted to share a couple of things we do when bicycling around town with our own littles. These are strategies we’ve used to get ourselves safely to a multi-use path, a friend’s house, summer concerts, or Farmers’ Market . . . anywhere, really. Practice getting yourself and your family to Open Streets Corvallis!

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Ride to the left of your child. Keep the youngest riders between yourself and the curb and yourself between traffic and your child. It’s okay to take up space while your kids learn to be predictable riders. (Predictability is so important!) Kids of balance bike age generally don’t have the judgement skills to lead the pack or follow behind an adult. (We’ll talk about riding with a sweep in another post.) Stay close, mama and papa bears. You don’t have to ride single file just yet.

Choose low-stress routes, when possible. It will make it easier to keep your child between you and the curb. For example, traveling south on 14th street may take you multiple entry points on campus, but 15th street has less traffic, more stops that slow everyone down, and ends at a crosswalk that leads to campus. Similarly, 29th may have a bike lane, but 27th can get you to many of the same destinations at a calmer entrance with less traffic on your route. Bonus if you can choose routes with fewer parked cars so you can avoid car doors swinging open.

It’s great practice for taking on busier streets later. And you will.

Sometimes you just don’t know how people-powered-friendly our streets can be until you use them re-imagined in a new way. Find out what we mean: portions of the streets between Cloverland Park and Harding Center are open to non-motorized traffic from 12-4pm on event day, August 19 (allowing for local neighbors to get to and from their homes, of course). You know we’re going to say it: come walk, bike, and play with us!